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2
Sep

How micro-location marketing is redefining retail

In this infographic from MDG Advertising, they explore “how location-based data is gaining ground to bring brands to a shopper’s attention. From delivering targeted mobile offers as buyers pass nearby stores to sending product-centric suggestions to shoppers’ phones as they browse the aisles, see how micro-location marketing is bringing brands closer to buyers.”

The Future of Proximity & Micro-Location Marketing [Infographic]

Infographic by MDG Advertising

27
Aug

Inside Insights: Visa Canada’s Head of Mobile Talks Canadian Shopper Culture

Next up in our Inside Insights interview series brought to you by Consumer Insights Canada, I was lucky enough to sit down with speaker Derek Colfer, Head of Mobile at Visa Canada, to discuss how Canada’s shopper culture is unique to the rest of North America.

Consumer Insights Canada is a conference focusing on the power of insights to inspire smarter decision making and shines a lens on shopper and consumer behavior in Canada. Whether you’re looking to break into the market for the first time, or just deepen your relationship with Canadian consumers – this is your must-attend event.

Here’s what Colfer had to say:

IIR: What makes insights “strategic insights”?

Colfer: I think all insights are strategic; however it’s their application to a specific opportunity that makes them meaningful and impactful.

IIR: What is the key to using the power of consumer insights to make smarter decisions in business?

Colfer: Consumer insights can help businesses evaluate the success of current products and are especially important when entering the product development lifecycle. The gaps in between product awareness, intent and usage can help businesses understand the needs of their customers. Visa recently utilized consumer insights with the design of Visa Checkout, a payment service that enables consumers to pay for goods on any device with just a few clicks. We know consumers are using their phones for more these days but that mCommerce can be onerous on small devices, leading to low conversion rates from cart to checkout. With Visa Checkout, we addressed issues like too many fields of information in the checkout process and big thumbs on small screens to ensure an easier online shopping experience.

IIR: How are shopper insights unique in Canada compared to the rest of North America?

Colfer: Canadian shoppers are savvy with a very high propensity for loyalty. A 2014 Maritz (Bond Brand Loyalty) report found that 90 percent of Canadians are members of at least one loyalty rewards program. We have also quickly embraced online shopping and have a high penetration of mobile usage. Almost 80 percent of Canada’s addressable population owns a mobile phone, according to a 2014 eMarketer report. These factors, along with companies like Starbucks and Tim Hortons who have tied loyalty to mobile payments, are helping to drive Canadian comfort levels with mobile payment adoption.

IIR: Where do you see the shopper culture in Canada five years from now?

Canadians will continue to use their mobile devices in a hyper accelerated manner. What we refer to as eCommerce today will become more of an omni-commerce experience, blurring the lines between various channels (in-store, desktop, laptop, tablet, mobile device, wearables, etc…) as consumers use more than one channel and form factor to search, compare, apply loyalty and purchase. 

Image via www.fortune3.com

Image via www.fortune3.com

IIR: What’s your advice on effective ways to reach Canadians on the path-to-purchase?

Colfer: There are various technologies available for businesses to engage and interact directly with their customers on more than one device throughout any given day. One challenge for merchants is to ensure content and offerings are universally available across all channels so that consumers can shop in the channel that best suits their purchasing patterns.

IIR: What’s the best part about shopping in Canada?

Colfer: Canadians are incredibly loyal and the Canadian brands and merchants that we frequent tend to reward loyalty in a very innovative manner. The most notable recent example is the CIBC Tim Hortons Double Double Visa Card with a pioneering two-button technology that enables users to switch between paying with their Visa card with built-in loyalty, and the redemption of their earned Tim Cash rewards. I think we’re going to see a lot more of this type of innovation and loyalty tied to apps as we move forward and it’s going to positively impact Canadian adoption of mobile payments.

IIR: How is technology empowering the always-on shopper today?

Colfer: Technology is incredibly empowering for Canadian consumers. It’s not uncommon to see a consumer take out their mobile device, open up an app and scan a barcode on a product in-store. That mobile app can provide access to an array of product reviews and ratings and it can also drive the consumer to make a purchase in-store with a profile driven incentive. Conversely, that same app can prompt a consumer to leave that particular store and purchase the product online or in a competing merchant down the street. Consumers remain at the center of the commerce lifecycle, however technology is empowering them today in ways we could not have imagined five years ago.

IIR: How do you embed a culture of customer experience at Visa Canada?

Colfer: Every digital product we build and put in market has been built with the lens of a consumer. Visa’s aforementioned Visa Checkout is a great example of this, and so is Visa payWave. Visa payWave allows a consumer to wave their card in front of a payment terminal to securely and quickly make payment, reducing time in line and at the cashier, improving the point-of-sale experience. This same technology provides the foundation for NFC mobile payment apps, which are gaining popularity in Canada and are available to consumers through Visa issuers like TD, CIBC, RBC, Scotiabank and Desjardins. Our Vision at Visa, to be the best way to pay and be paid for everyone, everywhere, prioritizes consumer behaviour and drives every product innovation.

IIR: What have you learned about Millennial shopper insights in Canada working at Visa?

Colfer: Millennials are early adopters of technology and are an important segment to consider in mobile payment adoption. According to a 2013 eMarketer report on age-based digital behaviour, Millennials are the prime demographic for digital adoption as they were born and raised during the emergence of the internet with an 80 percent adoption of mobile.

However, while Millennials are an important segment to consider with regards to mCommerce and mPOS, there are also other demographics with interesting behaviours that shouldn’t be forgotten. Gen X’ers lead all other age brackets in ecommerce purchases for family staples and are the most likely to transact on tablets and smartphones, according to an Ipsos Reid study cited in the same eMarketer report, and Baby Boomers have shown the strongest interest in loyalty programs. Sometimes I think we put too much focus on the current consumer insight trend rather than being strategic with more than one group.

IIR: How do you see mobile affecting the future shopper in Canada?

Colfer: Canada is already very advanced in contactless payments, but NFC payments will become far more ubiquitous. Visa was the first payment network in Canada to pilot NFC in 2010 and we were the first payment network to commercially deploy with CIBC back in 2012. To date, TD, CIBC, RBC, Scotiabank and Desjardins all offer various NFC mobile payments to their clients that run through the Visa Network, providing Canadian consumers with many accessible options.

Canadians love their mobile devices and I think they will become more comfortable using them in-store to make purchases quickly and securely. New technologies like Host Card Emulation (HCE), where consumer data is secured in a cloud, will help to increase consumer usage. Visa’s new cloud based payment specifications allow our banks to offer the same interoperability, scalability and security to consumer’s phones that they trust with plastic cards today.

If you’d like to hear more from Derek, don’t miss him present at Consumer Insights Canada. The event is taking place this September 29-October 1, 2014 in Toronto, Canada. For more information about the event and to register, click here: http://bit.ly/XPjI56

About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc. 

26
Aug

Shoppers cannot be manipulated at will

The next @Shopper360 organized by IIR @IIRUSA in Edinburgh shapes up to be a promising event. It looks like there will be less focus on new techniques like neuroscience and mood tracking. They can be useful in certain cases and on certain budgets but they sometimes take the focus away on real time shopper centric changes that bring solid revenue.

 

One of the key notes is by Phil Barden, Author of Decoded, The science behind what we buy. One of the learnings is that consumers create a filter based on their immediate needs, and therefore “cannot be manipulated at will”. Everything outside this filter is treated by an autopilot mode in which in store or in outlet signals however loud and clear are seen as in a kind of blur. We found in shopper research how true this is when we tested advertising materials in on premise outlets for a global beer brand.

 

We will be back with more on the rest of the program.

 

25
Aug

Free Webchat: Insights into Shoppers’ Behaving Badly

If shopper marketing is about influencing shoppers at the point of purchase decision, how much do we really know about how and where shoppers make decisions?

Our learning is increasing all of the time and we actually know quite a lot as an industry, but for some reason we often seem to forget or ignore everything we know when we try to influence shoppers.

In fact, a huge amount of money, especially if price discounts are being taken into account, is being spent often in ways that may neither help or be damaging to the brand.

We’ll explain what happens along the Shopper Decision Journey and give key insights into why their behaviour is not always what you want.

canada-359597_640This presentations looks at:

  • how shoppers really make decisions
  • the implications for shopper marketing
  • and how to drive a return on investment

When: Wed, Sep 24, 2014 at 10:00 AM EDT

Duration: 45 minutes includes Q&A

—>>> Sign up here

 

Speakers: 

  • Kirstie Hawkes, Director & Consumer and Shopper Lead, Kantar Retail Europe
  • Richard Tolley, Director & Consumer and Shopper Lead, Kantar Retail Europe
  • Lee Smith, Global Director, Retail and Shopper

 

Presented by Kantar Retail and the producers of the International Shopper Insights in Action Event, which unites over 250 of the most prominent retailers and FMCGs from across 35+ countries to share best practices (and next practices). Leading Researchers, Category Managers, Shopper Marketers, Merchandisers and Industry Experts attend to explore consumer and shopper behaviour, the decision journey and how to champion the value of activating intelligence for basket growth. We invite you to join us in Edinburgh this November and help build the future of retail together.

24
Aug

Your Guide to 2014 Trends, Research & Consumer Insights Events

Explore a deeper understanding of your customers wants, needs, and values this fall. Are you looking for more innovative tools and techniques to extract more meaningful data-driven actionable insights?

Get a deeper understanding of what drives consumer behavior with new innovation research technologies to connect with consumers in a meaningful way at Consumer Insights Canada this September as well as at IIR’s four upcoming research events this fall!

The team behind the World’s Best Insights Event – The Market Research Event, and Shopper Insights in Action introduce The Consumer Insights Canada Event. Bringing the caliber of actionable content, inspiration and peer-to-peer networking you have come to expect to Canada. This is a 3-day experience focused on the power of insights in motivating smarter decision making.

Consumer Insights Canada 

Check out our other research events taking place this fall:

The Market Research Event 

The 14th Annual International Shopper Insights in Action Event 

Foresight and Trends 

The Media Insights & Engagement Conference 

We hope to see you at our research events this fall!

 

21
Aug

Why Canada’s Shopper Insights are Unique

Next up in our Inside Insights interview series brought to you by Consumer Insights Canada, we sat down with speaker Nick Drew of Yahoo Inc. to discuss how Canada’s shopper culture is unique to the rest of North America.

Consumer Insights Canada is a conference focusing on the power of insights to inspire smarter decision making and shines a lens on shopper and consumer behavior in Canada. Whether you’re looking to break into the market for the first time, or just deepen your relationship with Canadian consumers – this is your must-attend event.

Here’s what Drew had to say:

IIR: What makes insights “strategic insights”?

Drew: What makes insights valuable is that they’re actionable – it’s the “therefore”, or “and so” part. People use their mobile phones a lot these days’ is an insight. ‘People use their mobile phones a lot, and look for mobile coupons. Therefore…’ is a valuable insight.

IIR: How are shopper insights unique in Canada compared to the rest of North America?

Drew: As a European, it’s fascinating working in North America. It sometimes seems that U.S. insights and marketing have a ‘we are the world’ approach; Canadian insights and marketing in comparison can sometimes be more about ‘we’re different’.

So, where brands in the U.S. obviously focus on the US, and see their work in the US as being a good indicator for the rest of the world, insights and marketing in Canada is based on the idea of Canada being different. It’s why we see the Canadian flag (literally and metaphorically) on so many marketing campaigns, and why research has to have that Canadian sample to really be valuable in Canada.

Image via sismarketresearch.com

Image via sismarketresearch.com

IIR: How do you see mobile affecting the future shopper in Canada?

Drew: Technology isn’t just with people all the time; it’s an unconscious part of people now. There’s very little conscious thought in the decision to look online for reviews for something; and it’s instinctive now for a significant proportion of shoppers to look online for pricing when making a big purchase.

Although Canada doesn’t yet have the level of ‘showrooming’ seen in the UK and US, as ecommerce grows more sophisticated here, people will become more demanding, and their devices will play vital parts at every stage of the path to purchase.

If you’d like to hear more from Nick, don’t miss him present at Consumer Insights Canada. he event is taking place this September 29-October 1, 2014 in Toronto, Canada. For more information about the event and to register, click here: http://bit.ly/1pHpNKF

About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1stDigital Impact, STEAM Accelerator and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc. 

20
Aug

Managing Channel Blurring

One of the ongoing themes that we come across in our analysis of major European retailers is the increasing prevalence of decentralisation within them. Perhaps this might be better expressed as a relocalisation of retailing: the recognition that relinquishing head office power and devolving decision making to regional and store managers is a much better way of conducting business than issuing diktats to a homogenised bunch of stores that do little to reflect the catchment area that they serve.

Carrefour, Tesco and Walmart

Retailers such as Carrefour, Tesco and Walmart have restructured in their domestic markets after periods of underperformance. Carrefour has ceased organising its operations around store size and has instead adopted a regional structure, re-empowering its store managers in terms of ranging and promotions in the process. Walmart has sought to reenergise its outlets as the ‘store of the community’ – a status that once enabled its managers to tweak assortment and promotions to suit local habits.

For its part, Tesco – buoyed by a relatively strong performance in London – has sought to replicate the successful organisational aspects of London in other parts of the country. This regionalisation makes so much sense. Tesco, by reorganising geographically, is acknowledging that there will be more in common between a superstore and convenience shopper in Bradford than there will be between two different convenience shoppers 150 miles apart.

Social Forces, Local Implications 

In some Tesco c-stores, ten litres of vegetable oil is a masterstroke of hyper-local merchandising

In some Tesco c-stores, ten litres of vegetable oil is a masterstroke of hyper-local merchandising

This taps into a lot of the trends that Kantar Retail has seen in its Retail 2020 research. Issues like immigration, urbanisation and the rise of Islam often have extremely localized implications. Importantly, these implications affect both consumption and shopping behaviour, meaning that a thorough understanding of both consumers and shoppers is essential for retailers and suppliers to win in this rapidly changing environment.

For suppliers, this means a further elevation of thinking and organisation. Most suppliers have (hopefully!) moved beyond thinking about their brands. Many have progressed to organising around their customers, and beyond that, organising around their customers’ channels. Clearly, there are different ways of doing this, but it’s fair to suggest that the more progressive suppliers are well advanced in this process.

The next step might be more tricky, but will be equally essential. Many clients I work with remain obsessed about winning in the main trolley shop. Other clients continue to obsess about winning in impulse. Understandably, they therefore align against hypermarkets and supermarkets or c-stores respectively. While this makes a degree of sense, the logic is becoming progressively flawed. Only 40% of total shopping trips are for the main trolley shop, while nearly 10% of shopping trips to c-stores are to complete a main grocery shop.

Discounters, meanwhile, are seeing huge growth in main trolley and convenience trips, moving away from their heritage as replenishment or top-up destinations. So, is organising around channels a relevant or sustainable strategy? Arguably not.

A Carrefour hypermarket serving food-for-now requirements

A Carrefour hypermarket serving food-for-now requirements

I’m not advocating for a minute that FMCG suppliers totally reorganise themselves around shopper missions, but it is noteworthy that some of the more successful companies I work with are overlaying shopper missions on top of their existing structures.

 

Shopper Mission Shift

A discount channel manager increasingly needs an understanding of convenience shopper missions. A Tesco or Carrefour account director should be mindful that hypermarkets are rapidly becoming food-for-now destinations, requiring immediate consumption pack sizes as well as the usual format portfolio required in big box grocery.

I look forward to seeing you in Edinburgh to explore further what changing consumption and shopper missions mean for retailers and, in turn, what this means for suppliers’ strategies.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Bryan Roberts is Retail Insights Director for Kantar Retail, based in London. Bryan has nearly 20 years of experience in the retail research and insights industry and has specialised in themes such as private label strategy, store concept development, Walmart and discount retailing, working for clients including some of the world’s largest retailers and suppliers. Bryan is a frequent commentator on retail issues for the global media and a sought after speaker at trade events.

Roberts, BryanHe is also the co-author of ‘Walmart: Key Insights and Practical Lessons from the World’s Largest Retailer’, published in 2012. Bryan holds a Masters degree in International Political Economy from the University of Warwick, and has been a Visiting Fellow at the University of Surrey’s School of Management since 2009.

 

 

 

19
Aug

Exclusive Interview: Using Consumer Insights to Make Smarter Business Decisions

In our next episode of the Inside Insights Podcast series brought to you by Consumer Insights Canada, I am fortunate to sit down with Consumer Insights Canada keynote speaker Kelly Harper, who is the Director Customer Experience Learning at BMO INSTITUTE FOR LEARNING, to discuss how the power of consumer insights help to make smarter decisions in business.

Harper goes into how important customer experience is when it comes using customer insights to make the best business decisions possible. You need to think about what type of experiences your organization is giving your customers.  Your consumer insights allows you to understand what is broken in your current experience you are delivering and what is really important to the customer – what are those elements that you have to get right each and every single day. Consumer insights will help you identify and keep track of what is most important to the customer.

Consumer Insights Canada is a conference that showcases the local Canadian culture in its storytelling. With new entrants like Target Canada, rapid changes in technology and increasingly discerning customers, the Canadian retail industry is in a constant state of change, challenging players to adapt strategies and tactics to remain relevant.  This conference was created for our insights community that focuses on the power of insights in motivating smarter decision making and shines a particular lens on the local flavor of shopper insights in Canada.

Check out the full interview here: 

Download this episode (right click and save)

 

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If you’d like to hear more from Kelly, don’t miss her keynote session, “How to Embed a Culture of Customer Experience in your Organization” at Consumer Insights Canada on Tuesday, September 30th at 10:15 am. The event is taking place this September 29-October 1, 2014 in Toronto, Canada. For more information about the event and to register, please visit our website: http://bit.ly/1khTaTJ

About the Author: Amanda Ciccatelli, Social Media Strategist of the Marketing Division at IIR USA, has a background in digital and print journalism, covering a variety of topics in business strategy, marketing, and technology. Amanda is the Editor at Large for several of IIR’s blogs including Next Big DesignCustomers 1st, and ProjectWorld and World Congress for Business Analysts, and a regular contributor to Front End of Innovation and The Market Research Event,. She previously worked at Technology Marketing Corporation as a Web Editor where she covered breaking news and feature stories in the technology industry. She can be reached at aciccatelli@iirusa.com. Follow her at @AmandaCicc

18
Aug

Are U.S. Stores Not Ready to Meet 2014 Back-to-School Shoppers?

With a back-to-school shopping period that runs from July to September, it’s critical for brands and retailers to ensure in-store execution is flawless to optimize this important retail opportunity.

Since brand loyalty is no longer enough to drive sales, companies need to capture an emotional connection to their brands.

 

Diving deeper into the importance of brand and retail store affinity, Gigwalk recently wondered what steps a shopper would take if a particular item was not available. What they discovered was both critical to retailers and brands, with 48% saying they would purchase at a different store and 36% saying they would buy another brand!

They recently conducted a study to learn if brands and retailers are reaping the benefits of the second largest spending season of the year – Back to School. With U.S. consumers breaking out of their spending slump driving back-to-school sales to a projected $74.9 billion this year, they sent their network of mobile-enabled independent contractors, or Gigwalkers, to 465 different super store, office supply, drug, discount and dollar store locations across the U.S.

Gigwalkers were asked to report on in-store conditions ranging from stock levels to display conditions and pricing, to offline versus online shopping trends. Each Gigwalker collected data for six product categories: backpacks/book bags, writing utensils, notebooks/paper, lunchboxes, clothing and tablets/computers.

Key findings on the issues reported were:

  • Gigwalkers reported 47% of the retailers visited had an issue with their back-to-school display.
  • Of the issues reported, 45% were due to the product being out-of-stock, followed by missing price and having the product in the wrong display.

Visit their blog to learn more and get access to the full findings.

12
Aug

Supermarkets as Instagram Inspiration

I often say that social media is a vast playground for research and exploration. Instagram is one the most recent platforms that has really taken off boasting 200 million Instagrammers capturing and sharing their lives every month7.3 million U.S. daily, 51% of the Class of 2014 uses it daily, with an 85% increase in usage amongst global teens between 16-19.

Knowing how visual arts, design and fashion tends to be a major focus for users of the platform, I was curious to explore how Instagrammers engaged with Supermarkets: what they expressed both in their posts and photos, exploring what drove them to share with their networks, if there were any major differences across regional aread and what other insights we could gather from the media:

Here are some that really stood out to me:

This Brisbane Blogger wrote “ I’m loving my new supermarket! It’s super fancy and I made friends with the people in the butcher,” on the pots above. Her fans remarked at how she makes the ordinary seems extraordinary while others said they had trolley envy. There is something about this photo that captures her excitement about a fresh start.  Woolworths is the largest supermarket/grocery store chain in Australia and she tagged them in her post.

This traveler thinks the Moscow hypermarkets are uber classy.

While this Tesco shopper saw another frightful angle to this innocent sign post.

Turf City Shopping Mall Singapore? One particular tag “#SupermarketAdventures” documents the delight and fun that shopping can be especially when it comes to weird veggies, foreign products and well, biking inside the shops.

Meanwhile, this supermarket in the Philippines offers a complimentary cutting service for fresh produce. How neat is that?

I also spotted lots and lots of selfies, shots of beautiful produce and people posing outside the stores. But what really struck me about most of the posts, with all humor aside, was how many people expressed their love of grocery shopping. Whether it was the new mom shopper who said this was the most exciting thing she did all week and was happy to be out, or the late night male shopper reveling in the mostly empty store, over and over again there was a joyful sentiment revealed in most of these messages. One that seemed to cherish if not relish the moment in the store, the displays and colors.

How can we utilize this inspiration to make the purchase journey more delightful, worth capturing?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

 

Valerie RussoFormerly a senior copy editor at Thomson Reuters, a research editor at AOL,  and a senior web publicist at Hachette Book GroupValerie M. Russo is editor at large of The Front End of Innovation BlogThe Market Research Event BlogThe World Future Trends Tumblr, the Digital Impact Blog, and also blogs at Literanista.net. She is the innovation lead and senior social media strategist for the Marketing and Business Strategy Division of the Institute for International Research, an Informa LLC., and her poetry was published in Regrets Only on sale at the MOMA Gift Shop. Her background is in Anthropology and English Literature. You can reach her at vrusso@iirusa.com or @Literanista.